Congressional Briefing: Findings from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

On June 16, 2016, a briefing was held at the Capitol Visitor’s Center in Washington DC on “Violence Against American Indian Women and VAWA 2013 Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction and Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: Findings from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey” by the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, Indian Law Resource Center and the National Congress of American Indians.

briefing copy
Group photo after the briefing. From left to right: Theresa Sheldon (Councilwoman, Tulalip Tribes), Cherrah Giles (NIWRC Board Chair), Deborah Parker (NIWRC Board Member), Leanne Guy (NIWRC Board Secretary), Wendy Schlater (NIWRC Board Treasurer), Carmen O’Leary (NIWRC Board Vice Chair) and Dr. Andre B. Rosay (Director, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage).

On May 5, 2016, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) published its latest research report examining the prevalence of intimate partner and sexual violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. Using a nationally representative sample from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, the report provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimization and briefly examines the impact of violence on the victims. VAWA 2013 authorizes Indian tribes to exercise special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction within Indian country over certain non-Indian defendants. This report increases awareness about American Indian victimization to inform policies and practices surrounding implementation of VAWA 2013 special domestic violence jurisdiction over non-Indians. In addition, the report highlights a critical need for further measures to intensify and strengthen the response to violence against American Indian women, and particularly Alaska Native women.

Key findings from the report:

 More than 4 in 5 American Indian and Alaska Native women have experienced violence in their lifetime. This includes:

  • 1% who have experienced sexual violence
  • 5% who have experienced physical violence by an intimate partner
  • 90% of women who have experienced sexual violence by an interracial intimate partner perpetrator

*Briefing Resource page will be out soon including video, photos and press release.